The Unexpected Joy of Atheism

In my previous Faith vs. Belief post, I discussed the fact that an important reason atheism cannot be considered a “faith” is that nobody actually wants to be an atheist—people only become atheists because they feel they have to. We all take comfort in the idea of a God taking care of us and looking after things, and especially the idea that we will go to eternal paradise when we die. An atheist has to actively fight against these deep seated desires and instincts, to accept the cold, harsh reality that there is no God to love us and take care of us, and that when we die, we really do just die. This is why—despite the extreme objective irrationality of a belief in God—most of us just cannot let go of this belief. I know I couldn’t—it took me years to simply accept what the facts were telling me, and embrace the reality that there is no God, no afterlife, and no higher meaning to my existence. It was a very slow and painful process. But astonishingly, once I was finally able to let go of that last vestige of belief, I suddenly found I was happier than I ever was at any other time in my adult life!

How on earth could this be? It was certainly an enormous surprise for me! Although I believed in God, I never followed any established religion, so I wasn’t really subject to the sorts of restrictions they put on people. Yet the first thing that struck me was how much more empowered—and just plain free—I felt as an atheist. I was never aware of how restricted I was by the idea that I wasn’t really the master of my own destiny, and that everything, including me, was under God’s control. Before, I was basically just a pawn on God’s chessboard, but now I was able to make my life into whatever I wanted it to be, because I was in control. This was an important factor in making me feel confident enough to launch my own web site, and express myself—in any way I saw fit—to the entire world.

In retrospect, I liken the process of becoming an atheist to growing up. At first, it is very difficult to let go of the comfort of having parents to love us and take care of us, as well as the comfort of knowing that you always have a safe home to go to. But there comes a point in our lives when we know we have to break free of this, and strike out on our own. It’s scary at first, but the freedom is exhilarating, and before too long, we can never go back to the way things were before. Moving from the comfort of a belief in God and an afterlife to the freedom of atheism is almost exactly like that.

I think there is another, more subtle, but important factor as well. I honestly think that—no matter how sincere we may think our beliefs are—deep down, most educated westerners don’t really believe in God. No matter how much we may want to believe—or how much we may think we believe—the irrational faith we have to muster to believe in God puts enormous restrictions on our ability to think and act freely, and the self delusion this requires really isn’t good for us. Psychologically, lying to yourself is one of the worst things you can do, yet I really think this is what educated westerners are doing to believe in God in this enlightened age. I’m sure any theists reading this will be screaming out “you have no idea what you’re talking about—I know I believe in God!”. In that case, consider this: if you’re really so sure you go to heaven when you die, then you really ought to be happy to die. Yet the vast majority of theists fear death just as much as (if not more than) any atheist does. Does this not show that—deep down—you really doubt that what you think you believe is actually true?

This also leads to my response to the classic question theists ask of atheists: if there’s no God, then why be good? If atheism gives you the freedom to do whatever you want, then what’s to stop you from being bad? One of the major reasons people believe in God is because we all want to be loved, and God is supposedly always there to love us if we believe in him. Yet like the belief in God itself, deep down we know this isn’t real. We still need real love from other people. This is also a factor which leads many people to go to church, as it provides them with a group of people to “love” them. Yet this isn’t real love either—nobody loves you for who you actually are, they only “love” you because you’re part of their church. Needless to say, this so-called “love” isn’t satisfying either. At the end of the day, there’s only one way to really get people to love you: to earn it. The businessman thinks he can do this with money, but in reality, it only leads people to use him—money really can’t buy you love! You have to make people want to love you, and there’s really only one way to do that—to be good to them. And this is the real reason to be good—not the threat of God sending you to hell!

So in summary, I think atheists are often happier than theists, because they aren’t restricted by what isn’t real, and are empowered by what is. At least that’s the way it’s worked out for me anyway!

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Another excellent post. I think your point about most (Western?) people not really believing in god is crucial. It explains why so many people get angry and defensive about religion – they’re not defending a secure position, but clinging to a cherished illusion. Stay happy!

  
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Thanks again valdemar! I think you have a good point that my comments on (lack of) belief in God should probably be restricted to westerners, so I have altered the wording of my post to reflect this.

  
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Dear Sachiko

I am totally Agreed with Dan Barker

Dan Barker, Author of “Losing Faith in Faith:” “I have something to say to the religionist who feels atheists never say anything positive: You are an intelligent human being. Your life is valuable for its own sake. You are not second-class in the universe, deriving meaning and purpose from some other mind. You are not inherently evil — you are inherently human, possessing the positive rational potential to help make this a world of morality, peace and joy. Trust yourself.”

  
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@Sachiko – Glad to be of some help! Slightly off topic, I’ve noticed that a common jibe against atheists is that we are all white and male – an inaccurate attempt at a smear, as your blog shows.

  
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Is that most educated westerners really don’t believe in God at their core, or simply that modern man has simply lost all belief in anything more transcendent than himself or something he can put his brand on: MY family, MY school, MY home, MY neighborhood, etc?
I think there’s a general tendency to NOT believe in or concern ourselves with anything we can’t identify as our own. This leads to the situation described in the old folk song “Little Boxes”:

“Little boxes, little boxes, little boxes on the hillside
And they’re all made out of tickey-tackey
And they all look just the same –
There’s a red one and a blue one and a green one and a yellow one
And they’re all made out of tickey-tackey
And they all look just the same.

“And the people in the boxes
All go to the university
Where they’re all put into boxes
And they all come out just the same.
There’s a red one and a blue one and green one and a yellow one
And they’re all made of tickey-tackey
And they all think just the same!”

So I salute and applaud your decision to THINK for yourself!

  
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Otis R. Needleman

Otis R. Needleman’s avatar

Sachiko, there is a God. Now, you don’t need to join a church or any particular religion to have God in your life. But God is there, nevertheless, for all of us.

I don’t believe life is a set of random happenings. I believe God has a plan for all of us, including you. Likely you will ask why God lets terrible things happen to people. I don’t know. I can only trust in God.

Apparently your business is doing well and you are in good health. It is easy not to believe in God when things are going well. But who do you turn to in times of trouble? Who can help you bear the unbearable, as it were? My faith in God has allowed me to get through times of trouble and bear the unbearable, more than once. And when I die I shall go to God and live in eternal life.

And yes, I am an “educated Westerner”. If you like, I shall pray for you.

  
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Hi Otis,

Don’t statements like “I don’t know. I can only trust in God”, “It is easy not to believe in God when things are going well. But who do you turn to in times of trouble?” and “My faith in God has allowed me to get through times of trouble and bear the unbearable” make it obvious that you simply believe in God because you desperately want to, and not because that’s what the evidence indicates? You have in essence proven the core of the argument I’ve developed over my posts on this subject: that people only believe in God because they want/need to, and don’t have the fortitude to accept reality.

And in times of trouble (of which I’ve experienced many in my life), I keep coming back to your earlier question: “Likely you will ask why God lets terrible things happen to people.” If you look at this question rationally – instead of desperately clutching for the comfort of a belief in God – isn’t the most logical, reasonable and indeed obvious answer this: that we suffer because there is no God?

If you’re really honest with yourself – and brave enough to see past your fears – I’m sure you would realise that you are deluding yourself, and that your “belief” in God actually isn’t real, and is only an emotional crutch. And if you are able to escape this self delusion, you may actually end up happier.

I appreciate your willingness to pray for me, but I really don’t think that will change anything. :-)

  
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Otis R. Needleman

Otis R. Needleman’s avatar

@Sachiko – Sachiko, I believe in God because God is an integral part of my being, not because I desperately need or want to believe, or I require a crutch. Having seen God at work in my life and the lives of others in various ways, I have all the evidence I need that God exists. Everything that happens in life cannot always be rationally explained.

I’m sure there is some theological explanation as to why people suffer, if there is a God. Not being a theological type, or possessed of infinite wisdom, I believe people suffer due to evil, and it’s a battle between God and evil.

Paradoxically, perhaps, I have little use for organized religion or church. Nevertheless, God remains an integral part of my life.

Looks like we are of two different worlds. :)

  
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Originally Posted By Otis R. Needleman
Everything that happens in life cannot always be rationally explained.

I guess that’s where we differ – I have learned that there almost certainly is a rational explanation for everything, even if we don’t actually know what that explanation is. Saying we don’t know something is not the same thing as saying we can’t know something. Science has already explained many things that we once thought were unexplainable, and will almost certainly continue to do so.

  
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I agree with much of what you wrote, Sachiko, but as a matter of intellectual honesty, I’ve been forced to admit to myself that I was driven to not believing in god by a need. A need to be free, which at least for me is the most basic core need (after food and water, I suppose) of my existence.

It is exactly like you describe with parents, I was driven to join the military (of all places!, don’t worry that was many years ago, and I’m out and safe now) just to get away from the endless love and care of my parents that was smothering my spirit.

And it wasn’t rational thought that drove me away from theism (although it sure looks like the universe is mechanistic/mathematical to my eyes) but rather hope that happiness was possible (which it isn’t with a parent/god always watching over you).

In short, I stopped believing in god because I am an optimist.

  
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Thanks for your interesting perspective Craig! I guess it’s inevitable that there must be some people who really don’t want to believe in God.

Still, maybe you were just more enlightened than the average person, in as much as you could see how much theism suppresses people right away, instead of having to go through the process I did.

  
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Excellent post!

I once wrote something similar: “It seems that one of the reasons that theists are not exactly flocking together to become atheists is that atheism is not a religion. On the other hand, if atheism were a religion, it would be the least attractive religion in history. After all, who does want to believe that there is no benign invisible friend, the Greatest Being in the Universe, who watches over just you day in and day out, who will rescue you from this wretched planet after you die?”

  
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(Hm, my post disappeared…)

I have a comment on Otis’s comment:

“Everything that happens in life cannot always be rationally explained.”

Even so, religious philosophy does not get have a monopoly on dealing with mysteries or with issues that cannot be “rationally explained.” The inability of science to explain something does not lend any credence to religious philosophy. To explain something by providing an answer that amounts to “Magic Man Done It” is to explain a mystery with another mystery.

We do not so much want answers to questions as solutions to problems — real solutions to problems that transcend the religious philosophies we happen to grow up with. Whenever we wind up with such solutions, science, not religious philosophy, has constantly been the one providing them.

  
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Hi Ian,

Thanks for your comments!

As you can see, your comment didn’t actually disappear – it’s just that we have things set up so that the first time somebody posts, it goes to the moderation queue. This is to protect us against spam.

  
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Dear Sachiko,

Sorry to add on that, whenever a doctor operates a patient, he/she tells to his/her realtives that we did our best on our side but the final result would be sent by the main doctor i.e God. Now, is any surgeon whom you know is an atheist? I am sorry to say that I believe in God but I am not quite religious. ( I am a Hindu but I don’t fully agree with it). I feel better when believe in God. Please don’t get irate over it.

  
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Hi Anurag,

I’m not going to get irate over your belief in God. :-) I should point out though that there are many, many surgeons in the west who do not believe in God, and of course, we have the best medical care.

  
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punny one for you…

Atheism is a non-prophet organization.

  
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LOL! I actually haven’t heard that one before. :-D

  
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However, Albert Einstein once said ” Science without religion is lame.” Are you able to challenge this intelligent man’s quotation? He was born as an atheist but ended up being a devout Christian.

  
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Actually Anurag, this yet another example of how willing Christians are to tell a complete and utter lie to support their beliefs, like Darwin’s supposed death bad recantation, which was a complete lie as well. Here is what Einstein himself said about this famous quotation spread about by Christians:

It was, of course, a lie what you read about my religious convictions, a lie which is being sytematically repeated. I do not believe in a personal God and I have never denied this but have expressed it clearly. If something is in me which can be called religious then it is the unbounded admiration for the structure of the world so far as our science can reveal it.

It has always amused me how willing Christians are to lie to support their beliefs – if they really had any confidence in what they believe in, then why would they have to lie to suupprt it? What’s more, this goes directly against the teachings of their own Lord Jesus Christ and the ten commandments!

  
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Hi Sachiko,

I’ve followed a similar path to yours in becoming an Atheist. My main reason has to do with the the astounding gaps in logic that most religions base their beliefs on. But the thing that really tipped it in for me is my study of Astronomy. If you look into the incredibly huge size that the known universe is, and really begin to appreciate the vastness of it, you realize that one God could not possibly be infinitely aware of every single event happening with every star in every galaxy out there. To say our earth is a tiny speck of dust in relation to the “universe” which would be our solar system in size, would be making our earth far too large, we aren’t even that big.

Anyway, after much soul searching, the thing I decided to take on as my “religion” is simply to strive to be at peace within myself every conscious moment possible. It isn’t an easy thing to do, but I feel it is a noble cause. I don’t think it goes against any God based religions to strive for inner peace. And if all people on earth would make this conviction to themselves, I don’t believe we’d have too many conflicts.

There’s my 2 cents. I hope it gives you strength.

Peace

Charlie

  
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Thanks for your comments Charlie! On a related note, something that’s always made me question religion is this possibility: what if we meet a superior alien civilisation? Who is their God going to be? If they are advanced enough for insterstellar travel, I suspect they wouldn’t have one, but even assuming that they did, do you think it’s going to be the same as any of the very human and earth centric Gods we have here? Of course not! Their God would be centred on them and their planet. Then how would we be able to justify our own Gods in the face of a superior alien civilisation?

  
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Good point. And the challenges which would need to be overcome in order to travel through space are HUGE, 99.99999% of the people on earth have nary a clue as to how difficult it is. The radiation problem alone is nearly insurmountable, after a year or two in space….it kills you. So in order to travel vast distances, any kind of “Rocket” would simply be a joke, it would take decades to reach the nearest stars and hundreds or thousands of years to reach any habitable planets we may discover using our telescopes.

So in order to travel in space, one needs to come up with a way of “Cheating” the current laws of physics to where you essentially go instantly from on place to another. This way you are not exposed to space radiation for more than a short time. And as you say if an alien intelligence can pull that off, there probably won’t be too many “mysteries” left to them in the physical world that need to be written off as miraculous works by a supreme creator.

On another subject, it’s funny how one of the greatest logic flaws in Christianity is the death of Jesus on the cross. His “Sacrifice”. If he indeed died, and that was the end of it, that would be a sacrifice. But he didn’t, he rose from the dead and is seated at the right hand of the father…..he’s second in command of the universe! Anyone who believes in him is saved from damnation after they die. So I ask “Who wouldn’t take that deal????” You die, 2 days later you’re second in command of the universe, and billions of souls will benefit from your action for an eternity. Where is the sacrifice here? I’m certain I’d do it, and I believe you would too. So it just isn’t all that special what he did, if, a huge majority of people would do the same thing given all the facts. < How’s that for Blasphemy?

Pax

Charlie

  
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Absolutely! I’ve always thought the whole Jesus story was just so riddled with contradictions and adbsurdities that I don’t even know where to start! I mean, we’re talking about God here – a being who is supposedly powerful enough to do anything. Why bother going through all this farce in the first place? Come to think of it, why even bother creating a universe that requires this farce in any case?

  
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Originally Posted By AnuragHowever, Albert Einstein once said ” Science without religion is lame.” Are you able to challenge this intelligent man’s quotation?

Yes, and the more intelligent someone is, the better he or she can rationalize away nonsense.

Originally Posted By AnuragHowever, Albert Einstein once said ” Science without religion is lame.”

It would make more sense if it read “Science without morality is lame.” But religion does not get to have some kind of monopoly on morality and ethics. Deluding ourselves into thinking that we cannot behave unless we are either theatened with hell or bribed with heaven by some imaginary sky parent is not the only system of morality.

Since you like Einstein quotations, I now present to you an interesting one: “If people are good only because they fear punishment, and hope for reward, then we are a sorry lot indeed.”

I honestly think that – no matter how sincere we may think our beliefs are – deep down, most educated westerners don’t really believe in God.

Yes, and they have faith in faith instead of faith in a deity. I honestly don’t like that sort of faith any better.

  
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I am very late to the game on this one. 8^)

I am a Christian. So, feel free to peg me as such. For me, God represents a point of accountability. I may not get the lavish bonuses of prayer that evangelists claim, nor the gifts of the ages that some show on television programmes, but I do understand (or at least like to think that I do) my world around me.

I believe that mankind, present company most definitely included, has made mistakes, and will continue to make mistakes, in our little blip along the continuum of string time. It makes sense for me to believe that if we exists, then something of greater sentience than ourselves may exist. It is the logically structural nature of my personality that leads me to this. It is the same inquisitive essence which drives much of the field of mathematics.

We do not yet possess the technology to travel across the continuum of time, but once it is developed, there is no reason to believe that one would be unable to travel along a multitude of time-lines after the development of said technology. Additionally, there’s no reason to think we could not jump across parallel time lines. There is the problem of parallel universes not having the same available technologies, but I follow a tenet assumption that there would not be parallel universes until after this development or the discovery of wormholes.

I believe in God, not because there is a “God-sized hole in my heart,” but rather because there are consequences to my actions in life, and I believe there is accountability. Everyone makes mistakes, and I do believe I make more than my fair share of them. Worse yet, my mistakes are intentional at times. 8^)

I am called to share about God, but that’s it. I’m not here to convert people, and I just wanted to let everyone know that I realize we have different beliefs. Perhaps you find mine to be irrational, but I believe because for luck or reason, the Bible has done well to stand up to the rigors of time. I am a Christian because it’s weird that a sect of people would risk their lives to proclaim a man as God… when he died just 20 years prior to the publication of their manuscript. Given the speed that it takes me to compose a thesis by hand, I think 20 years for someone composing such a piece… while running from the law… seems reasonable enough. My belief in God stems from my belief in science, and my choice of Christianity stems from the history and time-stamping of the new testament books.

I saw Religulous today, and it did make me laugh. I was disappointed that Bill Maher would choose to interview “truckers” to represent Christians… of course you’re going to get ignorant responses from a generally accepted ignorant group. Additionally, I am disappointed in his parallel references between Horus, Mithra and Jesus, that he simply accepts them to be true. I am going to read the Book of the Dead (a severe undertaking without any real understanding of Egyptian history) simply to see for myself. If anyone cares to hear my findings, I’ll post them along with citations. I actually think it will be fun.

I also wonder at times about the claims that the followers of Jesus made during a time when his contemporaries may still have been alive. If someone said “Elvis Presley claimed to be God,” there would have been a bunch of people saying “he claimed no such thing.” Within a few years, that rumor would die, perhaps surfacing a few years down the line (similar to urban legends/myths), but eventually being debunked as such. I would suspect the same to occur with any claims of Jesus’ divinity.

It is quite late, so I will head to bed, but I’ve found a copy of the book of the dead online. Here is a link to it, if you wish to join in my pursuit of knowledge:

http://www.sacred-texts.com/egy/ebod/index.htm

Here’s hoping we all learn something new. 8^)

  
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Thing is, there just isn’t any evidence for any accountability beyond the simple rules of cause and effect. Indeed, all the injustice and suffering in the world would seem to argue very strongly against any kind of “higher accountability”. Also, the belief that our own existence logically suggests the existence of a higher intelligence than ourselves leads to a logical paradox, as following the same logic, that higher intelligence would itself also require the existence of an even higher intelligence.

  
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Hi Sachiko,

But the rules of cause and effect aren’t so simple. We’ve constructed systems which show correlation, but no causal relationship for many events we’ve witnessed through time. The injustice and suffering does not argue against the existence of a higher sentience, merely that the individuals causing the injustices don’t care. People break laws every day, that doesn’t mean the laws don’t exist.

I think that problem with acceptance of many religions is that they are founded a principle of “Hell” being a separation from enlightenment, God, whatever you opt to call it, while those who do not believe or care for the religion would not mind being apart from it. This is one of the reasons that I’ve never attempted to convert anyone to my religious belief system. I honestly think it’s impossible for me to do. Politics, I believe I can affect, but religion, never.

The logic of an infinite string of sentience is a misnomer of mathematical constructs. Just because there are an infinite number of them, does not preclude the existence of a finite limit on the upper bound. Think of it like all the numbers between 0 and 1. There are infinitely many possibilities, and we can always find a number larger than any given number larger than zero yet less than one. However, this does not mean that the 1 is non existent, merely that there are many (infinitely so) possibilities to fall short of 1.

I do hope the above explanation makes sense. If it doesn’t, I apologize for my lack of eloquence. Heck, even if it makes sense, I’m positive there is a much more eloquent explanation than the one that I posit.

Thank you for being open and reading through my opinions, and thank you to everyone else who does as well. 8^) It is encouraging to know that there are available forums through which I can have an intellectual conversation and not be placed immediately on the defensive or placated to avoid discussion altogether.

  
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Hi Dane,

All of what you say is certainly possible in theory, but there just isn’t any good reason to invoke it – the universe works just fine without it, so why assume all this unnecessary complexity? As I say in my Faith vs. Belief post, the logical position is to assume non-exixtence until existence is proven.

  
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It seems that you are not anti-faith but just anti-Christian. Can you confirm this please. Maybe I am wrong. I am not a reader of your blog, first time, so I haven’t read other posts here but it seems you just have a standing position against this belief in Jesus as God/Creator.

Many people today are using the term “Fundamentalist Christian”. Can you define your idea of this term? Just curious.

Thanks, Alan

  
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Actually, I am anti-faith in general, but the vast majority of my readers are western, so like Richard Dawkins I tend to use Christianity as an example to explain what I’m talking about. Overall, I think Islam is actually worse at this stage in history, but few of my readers are from Islamic countries!

By “fundamentalist Christian”, I mostly mean the sorts of extreme conservartives who believe in the literal word of the Bible, and act accordingly. For example, advocating the teaching of creationism in science class, or the murder of doctors who perform abortions, or looking forward to the rapture etc.

  
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I can understand you opinion about the teaching of ‘creation’ in public schools. But I am figuring that you know the majority of ‘FC’s’ do not go around killing abortion doctors. I am sure it happens ever once in a while (which is not a good thing anyway) but I don’t read about this like I did 20 years ago. If they look forward to the rapture isn’t that their personal belief? I can’t see why you would be against people believing what they want. You want people to respect or at least tolerate your beliefs. This is the price we pay living in a democratic society. I am sure you believe people should have thier own freedom of belief, including Fund Christians. Don’t be so hung up on them or you will appear just like you think they appear. It seems that there is a modern day witch hunt against Fundamentalist Christians. Ironic. But they have been around your entire lifetime. They are not any different then they were 30 years. They voted their beliefs back then too, didn’t they? They are getting all the flak. I am sure there are millions of voters who are strict conservatives that aren’t in that group.

  
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I’m not attacking anyone – I just answered your question on how I define “fundamentalist Christian”.

  
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Okay. But you have to agree that if we all support a type of democratic process even the people that we might not get along with or agree with in our own foundational beliefs have the right to vote for what they hold to be truth. We all have to give some of the time. As long as the bill of rights and the constitution are not thrown out, any party (belief system) has the right to exist.

It seems SOME of your reasons for not ‘liking’ fundamentalist Christians are based on their personal ‘mental’ thoughts.

The overwhelming majority of atheists are not out of the streets foaming at the mouth and the same can, and should, be said for fundamentalist Christians.

  
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They do have the right to vote on the basis of their religious beliefs, and I have the right to criticise them for doing so, as I think it goes against their own best interests (as well as everyone else’s).

  
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Sometimes what we feel as our own ‘best interests’ isn’t good for us in the end. Not always but sometimes.

But you video about blaspheme against the Holy Spirit is a little over the top. I just thought it made you look like you’re going out of your way to insult them. No need to do that, don’t you think?

Anyway, we are who we are. If I was your Fundamentalist Christian neighbor we would get along. I make it a point to love and respect even if I don’t have the same ideas (beliefs). There are thousands of Fundamentalist Christians out there who do just that but they aren’t in the news. When anything becomes a big organized force it changes its true purpose and becomes corrupt, human selfishness and self interest makes it so.

  
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Hi Alan,

I can understand why you might take the Blasphemy Challenge that way, but I think I have already explained my reasons for doing it, and I stand by them.

  
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Hi Sachiko,

As an agnostic (bordering towards atheism) My religious sister ( who claims that she’s not religious) is always trying to persuade me to believe in God. Sometimes saying that if I still have doubts about God and die the next day, I will be screwed. She has a very bias opinion about atheists. She believes that atheists are unhappy, have no sense of imagination (because in her words atheists believe in nothing) Stubborn, lacks common sense, and other things. She believes that the rapture is going to happen one day. That’s one of the reasons I think every time religion is discussed, She is quickly is trying to persuade me to believe in God. Honestly, I think many stuff that she says is bullshit, but recently she said something that I’m now wondering about. She says that its total fact that atheists who on their deathbeds or had a near death experience had been either wishing for God to save them regretting their disbelief of him or had an ” Out-Of-Body” experience or whatever. And she starts to tell me about how some atheists became Christians or believers of God. One example she used in that theory was that of Kirk Cameron (a known Christian Evangelist, who at a young age was an atheist) So I want to know that is this is an actual fact that many atheists who were on deathbeds or dying started to cry out for God. and What’s your take on people were atheists before and are now Christians or believers of God?

PS: When I was researching about Kirk Cameron I found out about an event in which He and a fellow evangelist named Ray Comfort participated in a televised debate with atheists Brian Sapient and Kelly O’Conner of the Rational Response Squad about the existence of God. And when I kept researching about the debate. It was known in the debate that Ray Comfort stated that he can prove scientifically, without relying on faith or the bible the existence of God. And I want to know if You or anybody see this debate and explain to me what happened during the debate and what was Comfort’s claim of God existence?

  
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This death bead recantation stuff is yet another total lie that evangelical Christians love to put out, like their old trick of saying they “used to be an atheist but”, when in reality they never were (Kirk Cameron may well be one of these himself). The very famous example of Charles Darwin’s supposed recantation was a complete lie put out by one of his maidservants, which is denied by all members of his family who were present at the time (even though they themselves were Christians, and his wife Emma was desperate for him to recant, as she feared what would happen to him after he died). As I say in my post, if these people really believed this stuff, then they wouldn’t have to lie to support it.

There are of course odd examples of people who actually do recant on their deathbead, as people are rarely completely rational at this time, and they are also very fearful. Plus of course, there are some people who actually have converted from atheism to Christianity, but there are infinitely fewer than the other way around! As for Ray Comfort’s supposed “proof”, I know nothing about it (or him for that matter), and I think that if his proof actually held any water, we would all know about it.

  
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